Equinor and Naturgy have entered a development agreement that will be focused on Spain’s upcoming offshore wind auction, for waters off the coast of the Canary Islands. The Spanish government aims to transform its energy mix and plans to develop up to 3 GW of offshore wind by 2030.

The cooperation is in line with the two companies’ joint ambition of utilizing their complementary capabilities to develop renewables in Spain, starting with commercial floating wind projects. The Spanish energy company will contribute with its experience from onshore wind in Spain and Equinor with its capabilities in floating offshore wind technology and development.

“We are very pleased with the agreement reached with the Norwegian energy company Equinor, because it allows us to promote the commitment to renewables, contributing with our experience in the development, construction and operation of onshore wind energy, as well as extensive knowledge of the Spanish market,” says Jorge Barredo, managing director of renewables, new businesses and innovation in Naturgy.

“It is great to see the deployment of offshore wind in Spain. 3 GW by 2030 is an ambitious target, with floating offshore wind it is doable. Equinor has a long history in Spain and Naturgy is a well-known partner for Equinor. Together we now want to contribute long term to the country’ renewable energy plans and start off by developing the first commercial floating offshore wind farm in Spain,” states Jens Økland, Equinor’s senior vice president for business development in renewables.

“As operator and developer of floating offshore wind farms we know the technology works, and we believe our floating experience makes us uniquely qualified to contribute to the development of floating offshore wind in Spain in a safe, sustainable and efficient way together with our partner,” comments Sonja Chirico Indrebø, vice president of Floating Offshore Wind. “We look forward to collaborating further with the Spanish industry. Collaboration with ocean users is important to ensure co-existence with this developing industry.”

This post appeared first on North American Windpower.

Comments are closed.