Luxembourg-based offshore installation contractor Jan De Nul, tasked with installing wind turbines at the Kriegers Flak offshore wind farm in Denmark, said Thursday it had reached the midpoint of the campaign with 36 of 72 wind turbines installed.

For what will be the largest offshore wind farm in Denmark, Jan De Nul Group is installing a total of 72 wind turbines of 8.4MW each in the Baltic Sea, for the operator Vattenfall.

“All together, these turbines will produce enough green electricity for the annual needs of approximately 600,000 Danish households. Today, Jan De Nul is halfway: 36 windmills to go,” the company said Thursday.

The Kriegers Flak offshore wind farm will have a capacity of 600MW. It will feature 72 wind turbines, which will cover an offshore area of 132 km² at 15 to 40 kilometers off the Danish East coast.

On 27 January, Jan De Nul, Siemens Gamesa, and Vattenfall installed the first wind turbine for the Kriegers Flak offshore wind farm. The last turbine is scheduled to be installed in mid-June, approximately 4.5 months after the start of the installation campaign.

This offshore wind farm will become the largest in Denmark and will increase Denmark’s offshore wind production by no less than 16 percent.

The port of Roenne on the Danish island of Bornholm is serving as a marshaling harbor for the construction of an offshore wind farm.

The components of the Siemens Gamesa wind turbines are delivered from Denmark’s mainland. In Roenne, the various parts are assembled. In sets of four wind turbines, they are loaded onboard Jan De Nul’s jack-up installation vessel Vole au vent, after which the vessel sails to the offshore installation site off the Danish east coast.

About 170 kilometers of subsea cables will be installed to connect the offshore wind farm to the Danish grid. The wind farm is expected to be fully operational by the end of 2021.

In 2017 and 2018, Jan De Nul Group designed, built, and installed two large Gravity Based Foundations for the offshore high-voltage substations for the new offshore wind farm.

Jan De Nul built both concrete structures of 8,000 and 10,000 tonnes on a floating pontoon in the port of Ostend (Belgium) and then towed them to Denmark. In the Baltic Sea, the crane vessel Rambiz installed both foundations on the seabed.

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