Ocean robotics firm Houston Mechatronics Inc. (HMI) has developed the Aquanaut Mk II all-electric subsea transforming AUV/ROV, Triumph Subsea Services reports.

Houston Mechatronics ROV/AUV
Courtesy: Triumph Subsea Services

HMI’s Aquanaut is a multipurpose subsea robot which employs a shape-shifting transformation from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to a tetherless remotely operated vehicle (ROV), removing the need for large vessels as well as umbilicals.

HMI claims that the vehicle’s two distinct operating modes enable both the collection of data as well as the remote operation of maintenance and repair tasks at a significantly lower cost than today’s technology.

According to Triumph, the Aquanaut Mk II transforms like the MK I model, but now comes fitted with HMI’s Olympic work class manipulators and also has a deeper depth rating.

The Mk II model fully integrates into the USV, aptly called Hydronaut; both utilize HMI’s Wavelink architecture allowing for tetherless operations between the two intelligent robots.

“HMI have developed a truly game changing USV and tetherless robot combination,” says Triumph.

Specifically, this is achievable by: A purpose built USV integrated with Aquanaut Mk II utilising a unified control system; Over-the-horizon commanding from onshore control centers; In-field control on-board Triumph’s fleet of net zero, green construction vessels; Supervised autonomous control of Aquanaut for survey, inspection and constructions tasks; Operable in extended weather windows vs. peers due to no umbilical.

Triumph Subsea Services will outfit its fleet of green-oriented vessels with Houston Mechatronics Aquanauts.

In addition, the company will retain HMI mission services team to provide supervised autonomy support services for its Aquanaut fleet.

Triumph earlier highlighted Aquanaut as another example of how it utilises technologically advanced robotics and autonomous systems within its new green tech ecosystem of vessels that will be operating within the energy, offshore wind farms, offshore green hydrogen, and renewables sectors.

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