The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) convened universities and wind energy experts from around the country in the 2022 Collegiate Wind Competition (CWC). Kansas State University rose above 11 other competing teams to claim first place in the annual event.

The 2022 CWC focused on the theme of siting, outreach and development challenges associated with fixed-bottom offshore wind energy projects. Over the course of the 2021-2022 school year, 12 competing teams and four learn-along teams designed, built and tested model wind turbines, developed project plans, collaborated with industry experts and engaged with their local communities. The competition culminated at the American Clean Power Association’s (ACP’s) CLEANPOWER 2022 Conference & Exhibition, where the teams tested their models in a wind tunnel and presented their work to a panel of wind energy experts.

This experience helped prepare the students for careers in the growing wind and renewable energy workforce to support President Biden’s goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.

“A thriving U.S. offshore wind energy industry will drive new jobs and economic opportunity in our nation’s coastal communities,” says Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Kelly Speakes-Backman. “Armed with the experience they’ve gained from the Collegiate Wind Competition, these talented, ambitious young people are now well prepared to join the wind workforce and the fight against climate change.”

The winners were Kansas State University (Overall First Place), Northern Arizona University (Overall Second Place), James Madison University (Overall Third Place), James Madison University (Turbine Prototype Contest), Kansas State University (Turbine Testing Contest), Johns Hopkins University (Project Development Contest) and Virginia Tech University (Connection Creation Contest).

DOE is still accepting applications for the 2023 CWC, scheduled to be held in conjunction with ACP’s CLEANPOWER 2023 Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans.

This post appeared first on North American Windpower.

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